The 6 Times Samuel L. Jackson Made Tarantino Better

A few months ago we told you that Samuel L. Jackson and Tarantino did not start off on the right foot. But when two people are born with a vocation and aptitude for art, and also share coordinates, nothing can stop the happy collision. Today we want to remember the many gifts that the actor born in Washington DC on December 21, 1948 has given to the filmmaker from Knoxville, even though his birthday is Samuel. Cinematographic gifts, of course, many of them in monologue format with which the interpreter has taken us to cinephile ecstasy, raising the cinematographic level of the revered director. If, in addition, he has given him a toaster or a record, we already do not know that. Let’s go now, without further ado, to review those mythical scenes starring Samuel L. Jackson that have made Tarantino’s films even bigger. For them and for many others, the actor will receive an honorary statuette on January 15 at the 2022 Oscars for his impeccable career. It took a long time, right?

pulp fiction: their first date

Let’s start with their first job together: pulp fiction (1994). The film has a good handful of memorable scenes, but the sequence in which hitmen Jules Winnfield (Samuel L. Jackson) and Vincent Vega (John Travolta) break into the apartment of the kids who have tried to swindle capo Marsellus Wallas (Ving Rhames) will go down in history as the moment / psalm of Ezekiel 25:17. No one better than the versatile Samuel could have recited the bible inspiring both respect and fear. “Do you read the bible, Brett?” Jules asks the head of the losers. “Well, I have a passage memorized that is appropriate for this occasion.” And after pronouncing each of the words of the aforementioned psalm, fixing him with eyes of fire, the religious thug and his partner Vincent empty the chargers of their pistols on the unfortunate boy. pulp fiction It was nominated for Oscars in seven categories, but only won Best Original Screenplay. The French did give him what he deserved by awarding him the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival and the British refined it even more by awarding Samuel L. Jackson the Bafta for best supporting actor. Few awards won for such good work.

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Jackie Brown: the second one touched the fat man

Jackie Brown (1997) is Tarantino’s third film and the second with Samuel. He did not miss the opportunity and worked so hard that he took one of the biggest prizes of his career: the Silver Bear at the Berlin Festival. In the role of unscrupulous mobster, drug dealer and with a character of the devil even with his beautiful girlfriend (Bridget Fonda), he put up a guy who provoked as much fear in his opponents as laughter in the viewer for his outbursts in the high moments. The parking lot scene is just great. “What the hell happened to you, man? … Before you were a motherfucker,” he says without flinching to his henchman’s nerd, Louis Gara (Robert De Niro), after hitting the first shot of three. It’s sublime.

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Kill Bill: Volume 2a deluxe cameo

Surely Tarantino fans did not miss the actor’s cameo in one of the most admired films of the Knoxville filmmaker: Kill Bill: Volume 2 (2004). It is more thoughtful and calm than the first installment, with less martial arts and more western cadence, and in it Samuel L. Jackson plays Rufus, the pianist in the Two Pines chapel where Beatrix Kiddo (Uma Turman) rehearses her wedding with Tommy Plympton (Chris Nelson). He only appears for a few minutes, but his presence fills the screen in a beautiful flash back in black and white as if he were Thelonious Monk himself at the service of an excited bride (normally, she doesn’t know what awaits her). He was one of those killed in the Two Pines massacre. He shot Elle Driver (Daryl Hannah). We would have saved him for sure.

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Damn bastards: the voice of the story

In Damn bastards (2009) did not show his face, but he did lend his deep voice as a narrator in Tarantino’s most tremendous war comedy. On this occasion it was Christoph Waltz, another of the filmmaker’s favorite actors, who received all the applause and awards, including the Oscar, for playing the hateful Colonel Hans Landa. If you saw it in its dubbed version in its day, you missed the charms of Samuel telling this brutal story of double revenge, in the key of laughter, about Nazism in the middle of World War II. Below is the trailer for the film.

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Django Unchained: treacherous black

Whom Django Unchained (2012), the actor works a luxury secondary, Stephen, the turncoat slave and henchman of the cruel and ruthless owner of a Mississippi cotton plantation, Mr. Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio). In the scene in which Stephen keeps the protagonist tied upside down, the escaped slave Djando Freeman (Jamie Foxx), unleashes a monologue that absorbs him from the zero minute about what the rest of his life awaits if he hands him over as a hand of death. works for a mining company. After the spiel, anyone would prefer to be castrated as a Stephen threat at first. This is another of the actor’s great performances that raise Tarantino’s level in a film that won two Oscars and two Golden Globes for best original screenplay and best supporting actor (again for Christoph Waltz).

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the hateful eight: back to the first line

the hateful eight (2015) is their sixth film together. This time he returns to the limelight as Major Marquis Warren, a former Union soldier turned bounty hunter with a pretty bad reputation. In this parlor western full of intrigue, blood and snow, Samuel L. Jackson marks another monologue to frame: the one he recites in great detail about how he tortured and killed the son of General Sandy Smithers (Bruce Dern). Also worth reviewing is the scene in which, together with John Ruth (Kurt Russell), another serious bandit, he has a light talk about the pros and cons of being a bounty hunter. It is what you have to coincide with a professional colleague. The film, considered one of the best westerns in history, received three Oscar nominations, but only took one for the best original soundtrack signed by master Ennio Morricone. What less!

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And up to here all the times that Samuel L. Jackson has put his shoulder to make Tarantino bigger. Hopefully they will meet again soon and give us other great moments on full screen. We are waiting.

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The 6 Times Samuel L. Jackson Made Tarantino Better


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